Piracy used to be file-sharing. Now it’s stream-ripping.

Piracy used to be file-sharing. Now it’s stream-ripping.

October 29, 2018 0 By NewsTakers

Music News Published on January 19th, 2018 | by Alan Cross
It baffles me that people will pay $5 for a latte at Starbucks every day and yet cheap out when it comes to music.
For ten dollars a month–about 33 cents a day–you can have a subscription to a streaming music service like Spotify, Apple Music, Google Play Music, Tidal, Napster, Deezer or any number of other companies and have 24/7 instant access to 40 million songs, whenever and wherever you are.
It’s like when we used to tape songs off the radio but much, much worse.
Why would anyone go to this much trouble?
Though circumstances exist where stream ripping could be lawful, such as if the content were licensed for that purpose and the conversion were permitted under the legitimate service’s terms of use, the operations of many unauthorized stream ripping sites reportedly continue to contribute overwhelmingly to copyright infringement.
It took her TWO YEARS to write those books.
As the report points out “One advertising network based in Canada, WWWPromoter, is reportedly the fastest growing ad network among infringing sites and provides services to notorious markets listed below, including primewire.ag and 123movies.to.”
Pay for your music.
In his 30+ years in the music business, Alan has interviewed the biggest names in rock, from David Bowie and U2 to Pearl Jam and the Foo Fighters.

“The scale of stream ripping, and the corresponding impact on music industry revenues, is enormous. Plaintiffs are informed and believe, and on that basis allege, that tens, or even hundreds, of millions of tracks are illegally copied and distributed by stream ripping services each month. And YTMP3, as created and operated by Defendants, is the chief offender, accounting for upwards of 40% of all unlawful stream ripping…

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