After worker protest, Google stops requiring arbitration in sexual misconduct casesLos Angeles Times

After worker protest, Google stops requiring arbitration in sexual misconduct casesLos Angeles Times

November 9, 2018 0 By NewsTakers

The company bowed to one of the protesters’ main demands by dropping its requirement that sexual misconduct cases be handled in arbitration.
The company also promised to give its workers more details about sexual misconduct cases and to require more frequent training aimed at preventing misconduct.
The protest’s organizers estimated 20,000 workers participated in the walkout.
The walkout’s seven core organizers said they received the company’s response at the same time as other employees, and that neither Pichai nor other company leaders had met with them to discuss the concessions.
Google also promised to provide more details about sexual misconduct cases in internal reports available to all employees.
Those who fall behind in their training, including top executives, will be dinged in their annual performance reviews, leaving a blemish that could lower their pay and make it more difficult for them to get promoted.
Google didn’t address the protesters’ demand that it commit to pay women the same as men doing similar work.
The walkout organizers are not the only employees dissatisfied with the company’s response.
11:45 a.m.: This article was updated with walkout organizers’ estimate that 20,000 workers participated in last week’s protest and clarification of Google’s stated perspective on gender pay equity.
11:10 a.m.: This article was updated with additional details about Pichai’s email and comments from the walkout organizers.

One of those measures, SB 901, will earmark $1 billion in state funds toward fire protection over the next five years. Most of that money will go toward controlling the growth of chaparral and other vegetation that serves as perfect fuel for wildfires, helping them spread far faster than human crews can possibly keep up.

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