Bogotá’s Los Héroes to be moved in 2019 with city’s first metro lineThe City #Los_Roes

Bogotá’s Los Héroes to be moved in 2019 with city’s first metro lineThe City #Los_Roes

January 5, 2019 0 By NewsTakers

When Monumento A Los Héroes was inaugurated in 1963, in remembrance of those who gave their lives during the Independence campaign in South America, it towered over Bogotá’s most northern limits.
During more than a half-century, since it was planned during the presidency of Guillermo León Valencia, this stone edifice became entangled in a web of large-scale road infrastructure as the capital kept on expanding.
At the crossroads of Calle 80, Calle 76, Avenida Caracas and the start of the Autopista Norte, Los Héroes is a frenetic transportation hub, critical to vehicular mobility, and where the four cardinal points meet under the names of battalions that participated in the battles of Boyacá, Carabobo, Bomboná, Junín, Pichincha, and Ayacucho.
The statue of Bolívar was one of Frémiet’s final works.
Within the next couple of months Los Heroes’ historical timeline faces the ax, hammer, and power-drill after the mayoralty of Bogotá announced that the monument must be relocated in order for construction to begin of the first line of the Metro.
When Jaime Castro was mayor of Bogotá (1990-1994) he authorized the relocation of a monument in honor of the Colombian servicemen who fought during the Korea War.
When the city went ahead to build a tunnel – and bridge – that today connects NQS with Carrera 9, La Pagoda was placed in the garden of a monument-caring family, before officially finding a new home in a parking lot of the military battalion on Calle 106 with Carrera 11.
The most mistreated of all Bogotá landmarks, however, has to be La Rebeca.
La Rebeca became a case study in abuse, as vandals went at her, and after losing a nose and several fingers during an attack, the statue was removed from the park to grace a fountain at the corner of Carrera 10 with Calle 26.
The expansion of TransMilenio along Ave. Caracas and public works along Calle 26 forced La Rebeca into exile.

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