The ultimate guide to mountain photography #You_Re

The ultimate guide to mountain photography #You_Re

January 12, 2019 0 By NewsTakers

The world’s highest mountain range is the Himalayas in India and Nepal, while the longest mountain range is the Andes in South America, which touch Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Argentina.
A wide-angle lens is handy for capturing as much of the scene as possible, while a zoom lens will enable you to get more distant peaks, and to pick out interesting details, shadows and light.
Try to avoid overdone spots; there’s not a photographer on the planet that’s passed though the Grand Tetons National Park in the US without photographing the T. A. Moulton barn against the Teton Range .
The Teton Range in the U.S. is a classic mountain shot.
However, that shot is a good example of how important a foreground subject is.
Another common technique used by landscape photographers faced with mountains only partly in shadow is bracketing.
Don’t forget aerial views of mountain ranges, which can look stunning from above.
Make sure you have your camera with you in your seat, and when mountains come into view, take some images – with some zoom if possible – while holding the camera face-on to the window (not at an angle).
Mountain photography is not without problems, the biggest being weather.
Early morning mist can add a great effect.

These are similar to the neutral density filters above, but instead of darkening the whole image they only darken a portion of it. Their primary use is to reduce exposure in the sky, which avoids overexposure and blown highlights and allows high contrast scenes to be photographed in a single exposure. You can see this in effect by hovering over the image above, where the first image has no detail in the bright sky but the…

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