Lorelle Meets The Obsolete – De Facto #Meets_Obsolete

Lorelle Meets The Obsolete – De Facto #Meets_Obsolete

January 13, 2019 0 By NewsTakers

Lorelle Meets The Obsolete – De Facto
After a relatively slow start, 2018 turned out to be a rewarding year for Sonic Cathedral.
Making promising introductions for Swedish noise-gazers Echo Ladies, facilitating a more internationalist reach for the ambient abstractions of Argentina’s Sobrenadar and giving space to the psychogeographical Lancashire journeying of Mark Peters, the label proved that its open-borders policies were as commendable its as quality control calibrations.
Joined for the first time in the studio by touring band members Fernando Nuti (bass), Andrew Davi (drums) and José Orozco (synths), the core multi-instrumentalist twosome of Alberto González and Lorena Quintanilla lead the way through a sprawling yet succinct nine-song suite.
With the latter switching to singing in Spanish for the entirety of the album and the songs built with guitars often added as meaningful afterthoughts there is plenty bundled into these densely devised compositions, yet things don’t feel forced or cluttered.
With its funereal pulsing rhythms, disgorged guitar scree and echoing vocal incantations there are hints of both Low’s latter-day deconstructions and Julianna Barwick’s layered vocal mysticism on the opening “Ana”.
But this is only the start of the twisty turns and cross-fertilisations of De Facto.
Thereafter, proceedings veer through Goo -era Sonic Youth-meets-Broadcast chugging and churning (“Líneas en Hojas”); mesmeric Bardo Pond-soaked heavy-psych-rock (“Unificado” and “Resistir”); balmy buzzing retro-futuristic soundscapes (“Acción – Vaciar” and “Inundación”), the free-noise corners of the Can catalogue (“Lux, Limina); backwards ambient-noise (“El Derrumbe”) ; and entrancing neon-lit Slowdive-like swirling (“La Maga”).
It captures a band reaching out whilst remaining true to its belief systems, with very convincing results.
January 12, 2019 by Adrian

The pair spent a year working on Balance and the result is collection of songs they are proud to call their own. “We feel comfortable about every decision we made for the album,” González avers. Both musicians agree that the raw, angry sound of Chambers had something to do with their frame of mind under the circumstances at the time they made it. Likewise, Balance reflects their new, more purpose-driven approach. …

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