new airborne system into save Soldiers’ lives #Official_Army

new airborne system into save Soldiers’ lives #Official_Army

February 11, 2019 0 By NewsTakers

(Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo ) VIEW ORIGINAL 2 / 3Show Caption +Hide Caption – The Towed Jumper Recovery System deploys during U.S. Army testing.
(Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo ) VIEW ORIGINAL 3 / 3Show Caption +Hide Caption – A fully deployed Hung Jumper Release System safely carries a test mannequin to the ground during U.S. Army testing on a new system to help prevent issues with towed jumps.
Until recently, there were two ways to help a towed jumper, which occurs when the static line attached to the aircraft anchor cable becomes tangled with the jumper and/or the equipment and the parachute is not released — cut the jumper’s static line so the Soldier can deploy his or her reserve parachute or pull the Soldier back into the aircraft.
In March 2017, in an effort to eliminate the possibility of a towed jumper situation, the Aerial Delivery Directorate’s Airdrop Technology team submitted a project proposal to the U.S. Army Foreign Comparative Testing Program, which is embedded in RDECOM’s Global Technology Office, as part of their annual call for proposals.
The HUPRA, which includes an emergency parachute that is released once the Jumpmaster cuts the aircraft anchor line cable, is manufactured by IrvinGQ in the UK.
The tests, which were conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, used mannequins that “jumped” out from the aircraft’s side doors and ramp.
Before a Soldier jumps out of an aircraft, a Jumpmaster conducts a personnel inspection of the Soldier’s attaching, jumping and releasing equipment.
A complete developmental test was performed on the Towed Jumper Recovery System (the Army name for the slightly modified HUPRA) at YPG, including aircraft procedures development, safety evaluation, rigging procedure development and performance testing.
“The TJRS program has been positively briefed to the Army Airborne Board,” Corner said.
The FCT Program provides an avenue for Army engineers, scientists and program managers to acquire, test, and evaluate items and technologies from foreign industry allies and other friendly nations that may fill an Army capability gap or other urgent need.

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