Revitalization efforts along FM 1960 ramp Up despite funding challenges #FM_1960

Revitalization efforts along FM 1960 ramp Up despite funding challenges #FM_1960

February 12, 2019 0 By NewsTakers

249 and I-45 lacks a funding source—such as property or sales tax revenue—to pursue most of the improvement projects recommended by recent studies, said Bobby Lieb, vice president of community and economic development for the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce.
In the meantime, the HNWCC and organizations such as the FM 1960-area nonprofit HOPE Haven, which works with the area’s homeless population, are looking at work that can be started in the community without legislative intervention.
Meanwhile, other grassroots efforts on the corridor include HOPE Haven’s plan to form a resource center for the area’s homeless.
The area’s status as an unincorporated portion of Harris County continues to present challenges to redevelopment, said Steve Spillette, president of Houston-based Community Development Strategies, which conducted the 2010 study examining the revitalization potential of the corridor.
The study stated nearby east-west corridors with greater appeal to affluent customers that have emerged since the 1990s include Louetta Road, FM 2920 and Spring Stuebner Road.
In the past 10 years, the number of businesses in three ZIP codes along FM 1960—77068, 77069 and 77090—has decreased, according to U.S. Census Bureau information.
Only one of the five ZIP codes originally included in the Spillette study between Hwy.
249 and I-45—77066—has seen the number of businesses increase from 2009-16.
The projects proposed within the study would have cost as much as $115 million each to undertake, but no funding sources were identified in the study.
A tax increment reinvestment zone, Public Improvement District or municipal management district—economic development tools created by a governmental entity—could create a public funding mechanism for a portion of the FM 1960 corridor through property taxes or other methods, according to both the H-GAC and Spillette studies.

I wanted to meet Dalbey at Big Spring this morning for two reasons. The first is that he knows perhaps more than anyone alive about what life was like along the Trinity River before John Neely Bryan showed up. Dalbey participated in a large archaeological dig in the Trinity watershed, uncovering thousands of artifacts—arrowheads, broken pieces of tools, spear points—at a site a few hundred feet from here. The findings…

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