English words fail into take root at Polish vernacularThe Guardian #English_Words

English words fail into take root at Polish vernacularThe Guardian #English_Words

October 13, 2019 0 By NewsTakers

The constant shuttling of hundreds of thousands of mostly young Polish workers between Poland and Britain has had a big and visible impact on demographics, economics and culture.
But the influence on language is curiously hard to pin down.
That is partly because Polish, like Poland itself, has been subjected to successive waves of invasions.
Americanisms have been here since before the end of communism, arriving principally through television and films.
The other wide-open portals through which English words have poured into the everyday language are through western management jargon, computers and the internet.
This linguistic invasion would have happened without a single Pole moving to Britain looking for work.
It started with the mass arrival of US business consultants in Warsaw in 1990 – the archetypal biznesmen and bizneswomen seeking to set up ‘joint ventures’.
It continues today with social media such as Facebook (fejsbuk).
After meeting someone for the first time, you could wyguglowac (Google) them, and then perhaps rzucic posta na fejsa (add a post on Facebook).
Owing to an editing change to the original text, the article referred to “kelnerzy w offisie”.

As I picked up my morning coffee, I scoped out the place for possible prey. A new cock to suck from a suitable guy was on my breakfast menu. I made eye contact with a good-looking 30-something but quickly realized that he was a former conquest. As he approached to say hello, I raised my hand like a traffic cop and shook my head no. He stopped and retreated, obviously disappointed. I was looking for some fresh meat. However, I was so horny and hungry for cock and hot cum that if nothing new was to my liking I would go back to the 30-something, but I had to act quickly, as always.

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